Ageing, Disability & Home Care

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ADHC speech pathologists honoured with University of Sydney award

Harmony Turnbull, Regional Senior Speech Pathologist for Metro North accepts the award from Dr Kirrie Ballard, Head of Discipline, Speech Pathology University of Sydney.
Harmony Turnbull, Regional Senior Speech Pathologist for Metro North accepts the award from Dr Kirrie Ballard, Head of Discipline, Speech Pathology University of Sydney.

22 Dec 2011

Ageing, Disability and Home Care’s speech pathologists have received the 2011 Deirdre Russell Service Recognition Award in honour of their work with University of Sydney students.

The award recognises members of the community or profession who have, in a non-paid capacity, made a substantial contribution to the education of students in the Discipline of Speech Pathology (formerly the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders).

Over the last two years alone ADHC speech pathologists took more than 140 students on placements.

Dr Kirrie Ballard, Head of Discipline, Speech Pathology praised ADHC’s Office of the Senior Practitioner, and the work of its practice leaders. Dr Ballard said ADHC’s Practice Leader in Speech Pathology Felicity Burke had helped formalise many documents and processes, and solidified the university’s links with ADHC.

Dr Ballard also cited the significant contribution AHDC speech pathologists have made to student training, research, academic program, quality improvement projects and more.

“We are really pleased that a high number of our recent graduates have had lengthy adult or paediatric clinical placements within ADHC services,” Dr Ballard said.

Ms Harmony Turnbull, Regional Senior Speech Pathologist for Metro North accepted the award in November on behalf of all ADHC speech pathologists.

In her acceptance speech, Ms Turnbull thanked people with a disability, their families and carers.  

“It is these people we should acknowledge in accepting this award. Those who have allowed students access to some of their most intimate of functions – how they communicate, eat, drink and live,” Ms Turnbull said.

“It is intensely personal. These people, their carers and families generously accept the need for students to learn and participate.”

Students themselves say that experiencing person/family centred approaches and learning about disability in the ‘real world’ is invaluable for their learning.

 

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